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Archive for November, 2011

Much more winter blessing

… Blessed are you, winter,

with your wild and varied moods,

so intent on being yourself,

you refuse to be a people-pleaser.

Blessed are you, winter,

when ice storms crush our hearts and homes,

you call forth the good in us

as we rush to help one another.

Blessed are you, winter,

your inconsistent moods

often challenge spring’s arrival

yet how gracefully you step aside

when her time has come.

— Joyce Rupp and Macrina Wiederkehr, The Circle of Life, p. 234

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More winter blessing

… Blessed are you, winter,

your bleak, barren trees

preach wordless sermons

about emptiness and solitude.

Blessed are you, winter,

you teach us valuable lessons

about waiting in darkness

with hope and trust.

Blessed are you, winter,

season of blood red sunsets

and star-filled, long, dark nights,

faithfully you pour out your beauty.

Blessed are you, winter,

when your tiny snowflakes

flurry through the air,

you awaken our sleeping souls. …

— Joyce Rupp and Macrina Wiederkehr, The Circle of Life, p. 233-4

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A winter blessing

Blessed are you, winter,

dark season of waiting,

you affirm the dark seasons of our lives,

forecasting the weather of waiting in hope.

Blessed are you, winter,

you faithfully guard a life unseen,

calling those who listen deeply

to discover winter rest.

Blessed are you, winter,

frozen and cold on the outside,

within your silent, nurturing womb

you warmly welcome all that longs for renewal. …

— Joyce Rupp and Macrina Wiederkehr, The Circle of Life, p. 233

 

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New growth

Winter is a lesson about the fine art of loss and growth.

Its lesson is clear: There is only one way out of struggle

and that is by going into its darkness,

waiting for the light, and being open to new growth.

— Joan Chittister, from Rupp and Wiederkehr, The Circle of Life, p. 227

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Wooing nature

Surgeons are no more than agents of the process by which an offending force may be sufficiently held at bay to aid nature in its inherent tendency to restore health. For me, surgery has been the distilled essence of W. H. Auden’s perspective prĂ©cis of all medicine: “Healing,” said the poet, “is not a science, but the intuitive art of wooing nature.”

— Sherwin B. Nuland, The Wisdom of the Body, p. 279

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Miracles with flaws

A little lower than the angels, and crowned with glory and honor

What a paradox it is, then, that we so often take the marvels of our bodies for granted and express shock when an occasional imperfection makes itself known. For we are, of necessity, miracles with flaws. There is fascination in the flaws and in nature’s manner of dealing with them, just as there is fascination in the truly marvelous aspects of how we are made. We do well to have knowledge of both the marvels and the mistakes — we profit by learning what we can of our kind, and of ourselves.

— Sherwin B. Nuland, The Wisdom of the Body, p. 3

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Promise

That sense

of promise

and fulfillment

which the

world held

for us in the

morning

of our lives

was not false,

and since

we live

in spheres

morning

is constantly

renewed

if we rise to

greet it.

— Michael Drury

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